Image from web page 483 of “Knight’s American mechanical dictionary : a description of tools, instruments, machines, processes and engineering, history of inventions, common technological vocabulary and digest of mechanical appliances in science and the ar

A couple of good china mechanical engineering photos I identified:

Image from web page 483 of “Knight’s American mechanical dictionary : a description of tools, instruments, machines, processes and engineering, history of inventions, general technological vocabulary and digest of mechanical appliances in science and the ar

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Identifier: knightsamericanm02knig
Title: Knight’s American mechanical dictionary : a description of tools, instruments, machines, processes and engineering, history of inventions, common technological vocabulary and digest of mechanical appliances in science and the arts
Year: 1882 (1880s)
Authors: Knight, Edward H. (Edward Henry), 1824-1883
Subjects: Industrial arts Mechanical engineering
Publisher: Boston : Houghton, Mifflin and Business

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Text Appearing Just before Image:
and roll-ing of the vessel. The needle, the eitrd, rhumb-ceird,eompass-eeird, or fly, is cost-free to float around accordingto its magnetic impulse, and a mark on the frontside of the circumscribing i-ing shows the directionof the ships head. The dnb is the .socket of theneedle on the pivotal pin. ^ is a vertical central section of the compass, ashung in gimbals. /? is a view looking down upon the identical. is a chait showing the compass notation. The MAKINEirS COMPASS. 1396 MARINERS COMPASS. murks aie recognized as cardinals, N. S. E. W., and in-tervening are the other 28 points. 1) is tlie Chine.se compass-card. The needUi of the Chinese compass is really .shortand light, not exceeding an inch in length, and somuch of its weight is beneath the point of suspension,tliat it is but tiny atferted by the diji or inclination.The indicates of suspension is a steel point rising fromtlie bottom of the wooden compass-bo.x and enteringa hemispherical copper cup attached by copper stripsto the needle. Fig. 3069.

Text Appearing Soon after Image:
Mariners Compass. Sir George Staunton, who accompanied Lord Ma-cartney in his embassy to China, describes it in hisaccount of the embassy Upon the upper surfaceof the bo. are drawn numerous concentric circles, dis-tinguished by different Chinese characters. The eight marks on the inner circle mark the cardinalpoints, south, north, east, west, and the bisectingintermediate points. The same eight characters alsosignify equal divisions of the natural day, so thatthe instrument answers to some extent the purposeof a dial, every single division marking 3 hours. TheChinese character for sunrisr is the .same as that forcast, and in this kind was the initial comjja.-s whichfound its way to Europe in the beginuiug of thefourteenth century. Other circles have 12 anil 24divisions, with characters which mark correspondingportions of the heavens and of thi all-natural day.Every of the latter portions embraces 15° of the 360°into which the circle has been arbitrarily divided incorrespondence with the supp

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not completely resemble the original perform.

Image from web page 641 of “Knight’s American mechanical dictionary : a description of tools, instruments, machines, processes and engineering, history of inventions, basic technological vocabulary and digest of mechanical appliances in science and the ar

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Identifier: knightsamericanm02knig
Title: Knight’s American mechanical dictionary : a description of tools, instruments, machines, processes and engineering, history of inventions, general technological vocabulary and digest of mechanical appliances in science and the arts
Year: 1882 (1880s)
Authors: Knight, Edward H. (Edward Henry), 1824-1883
Subjects: Industrial arts Mechanical engineering
Publisher: Boston : Houghton, Mifflin and Company

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
orks. The massis taken out under, ]nit in baskets, and pressed.The procedure is repeated. The details of the opera-tion are probablj- almost identical with these inrogue .three,000 years ago. In China, the [lestle ami mortar (/) are utilised inreducing to powder the seeds of the oil-bearing tea-plant. The meal is boiled in bags and pressed toyield the oil. The lever is tripped by the cogs ofthe sprocket-wheel, ami falls by gravity. c shows the press employed in China in crushing theseeds of the tallow-tree. The weighted wheel is sus-pended by a rod from a beam, and is oscillated toand fro by the workman, traveling iipon the seedswhieli are placed in the trough under. The oil pro-cured from the bruised seeds by heat and pressure isadded to vegetable oil and wa. to the essential con-sistence for candles. OIL-OF-BRICK. 1554 OIL-PRESS. A (Fig. 3382) illustnitcs a mill for crushing seedspreparatory to e.xtractiiig the oil thcrelVora by press-ure. The seeds are led from the hopper a by a IoUer Fig 3382.

Text Appearing Following Image:
Oil-Mills. b, the amount getting regulated by an adjustable plate,and pass in between the crushing-rollers c d, the smallerone of which has adjustable bearings, so that thedistance among them may be varied. Theroller is driven by belt and pulley, and has agear which moves the smaller one particular. £ shows a mill, heater, anil juess combined. Fig. 3383 is the olive-mill of Barbory. Fig. 3383. largerspur-

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Image from web page 620 of “Knight’s American mechanical dictionary : a description of tools, instruments, machines, processes and engineering, history of inventions, common technological vocabulary and digest of mechanical appliances in science and the ar

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Identifier: knightsamericanm02knig
Title: Knight’s American mechanical dictionary : a description of tools, instruments, machines, processes and engineering, history of inventions, basic technological vocabulary and digest of mechanical appliances in science and the arts
Year: 1882 (1880s)
Authors: Knight, Edward H. (Edward Henry), 1824-1883
Subjects: Industrial arts Mechanical engineering
Publisher: Boston : Houghton, Mifflin and Company

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Pictures From Book

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Text Appearing Before Image:
their point ofgreatest elevation. NORIA. 1533 NORIA. The modes of constructing and operating are va-rious : — 1. The original type appears to be a wheel withbuckets or pots every pivoted to the rim at a point aboveits center of gravity, so as to liang perpendicularly.These are submergeil in the water at t!ieir lowest point,and, rising, are upset Ijy make contact with with a fixed obsta-cle at their highest point, discliarging into a chuteor trough which conducts the water to a reservoir.a h. Fig. 3333, show two lorms of the device, — awheel with boxes in its rim, and one particular with susiiendedbuckets. The Cliiuese noria c is created of bamboo, exceptingthe hub of tlie wheel and the posts on which itrests. The buckets are liainboo tulies, inclined so asto hold nearly to their capacity till they attain theirculminating-point. The wheels are from 20 to 40feet in diameter, according to scenario, and aredriven by the impinging of the stream upon periph-eral Hoat-boards. One particular described by Sir George Fig. 3333.

Text Appearing After Image:
Norias^ or Bucket- Wheels. Staunton was 30 feet in diameter had 20 buckets,four feet lengthy and 2 inches diameter in the clear, hold-ing ycT of a gallon 12 gallons to a revolution, 4revolutions and 48 gallons per minute over 300tons per day. The reference to water, and to implies for get-ing it, are quite frequent in the Bible. In the considerably-misunderstood text in Ecclesiastes we discover a refer-ence to tlie nor in : — Or ever the silver cord be loosed, or the goldenhowl broken, or the pitcher be broken at the foun-tain, or the irhccl broken at the cistern. These wheels have been utilised from time immemo-rial in raising water for irrigation, in Assyria, Egypt,Pereia, Syria, Arabia, and Palestine, and no doubtin China and India, but have undergone numerous modi-fications. Thompson, in his The Land and the Book,says: This s^-stem of water-wheels is noticed on agrand scale at Hums Hamath and all along theOrontes. The wheels tliere are of huge size, 80or 90 feet. They are driven by the river itsel

Note About Pictures
Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned page images that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations may possibly not completely resemble the original perform.

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