Nice Mechanical Engineering China photos

Verify out these mechanical engineering china pictures:

Image from web page 605 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
mechanical engineering china
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Identifier: railwaymechanica93newy
Title: Railway mechanical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad vehicles
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Just before Image:
ing-Suiyuan, ownand operate their personal dining vehicles. The second-class equipment is usually supplied withserviceable wooden seats and tlie third-class sometimes withcheaper seats, but regularly with benches in some in-stances, particularly when the coolie class is carried, noseats of any sort are offered. A single of the illustrationsshows the vestibules and one particular finish of a diner on the Peking-Mukden Railway. It will be noticed that there are nosteps to the vestibule platforms. This requires all stationplatforms to be constructed with only a low step from the vestibule.In no instance noted by tlie writer was any passenger equip-ment heated from tlie locomotive, the only hose connectionbeing the one for air brakes. FREIGHT Cars The initial equipment on the 1st Chinese railways (exceptthat bought from America) was of little capacity, andmuch of it can ideal be termed goods wagons, but thetendency has steadily been toward equipment of greatercapacity until right now virtually all new freight vehicles are

Text Appearing Following Image:
Kind of Freight Car Truck Used on the Pektng-Hankow Railway:Note the Vertical Plane Coupler on the End of the Vehicle 67,200 lb., or 30 extended tons capacity. All the Chinese rail-techniques use the British practice of a loading gauge. The sizeof gear is somewhat restricted, and it would appearvery desirable to increase this in the case of new railwayconstruction, to permit of the utilization of bigger equipmentas the visitors develops, especially if this improvement shouldbe along commodity lines. A freight-car truck in basic use on the Peking-Hankowline is shown in one of the illustrations and one more showsa standard box auto utilized on most of the Chinese railways. Itwas stated that this sort of construction is really satisfactoryon all the lines north of the Yangtze River, but that thedeterioration of the sheet iron on the southern lines, such asthe Shanghai-Nanking, is quite severe. With the scarcityof lumber in China, nevertheless, this design would seem tohave a lot merit. Automobile WHEELS The Briti

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations might not completely resemble the original work.

Image from web page 318 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
mechanical engineering china
Image by Net Archive Book Pictures
Identifier: railwaymechanica96newy
Title: Railway mechanical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Pictures: All Images From Book

Click right here to view book on the web to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Prior to Image:
summary ofa portion of these tests for one steel containing .62 per centcarbon, three.S per cent chromium, IS.five per cent tungsten and1.6 per cent vanadium was created. An interesting featureis the effect of the temperature of preheating on the cuttingc|ualities of the tools, as expressed by the pounds of metalcut. This is shown in the table beneath: PreluatiliR mill, at 1,400 dcg. F.min. at 1.500 deg. F.min. at 1,6110 deg. F.min. at 1,600 dcg. F.Note—All testinq condil at 2,417 deg. F.—Oil at two,417 deg. P.—Oil at two,417 deg. F.—Oil at two,417 deg. F.—Water netal reduce per tool (fourimIs tested) The final results obtained when making use of water as the quenchingmedium are about the same as when employing oil.

Text Appearing Following Image:
Heavy Mallet Locomotive for Pekin-Suiyuan Biggest Locomotives Exported or Operated Outsideof the I nited States Now in Service in China IT is somewhat startling to tind that the biggest locomotivesthat have (.er been ^xpor.td t.(in .his e:.untry and themost effective in operation outside of the United Statesare these shipped by the American Locomotive Companyto the Pekin-Suiyuan Railway in China. Even though thisancient nation is most inadequately offered with rail-road facilities and most of the transportation is nonetheless carriedon l&gty the exact same methods that have been in vogue for cen-turies, this railroad is strikingly progressive. Additionally,it has been Imilt and is now operated solely by Chmese.Ihe greater portion of the line was laid out and constructedunder the path of Dr. Jeme Tren-Yow, chief engineer..ftcr graduating from Yale University in 18X1, he returnedto his native land and rose to such a ])osition that he wasrecognized as the most prominent Chinese civil engineer.On

Note About Pictures
Please note that these photos are extracted from scanned page pictures that may possibly have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations could not completely resemble the original perform.

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