Hagen – Freilichtmuseum Hagen – Sensenschmiede 09

Verify out these milling engineering photos:

Hagen – Freilichtmuseum Hagen – Sensenschmiede 09
milling engineering
Image by Daniel Mennerich
The Hagen Open-air Museum (LWL-Freilichtmuseum Hagen – Westfälisches Landesmuseum für Handwerk und Technik English: &quotLWL Open-air Museum Hagen – Westphalian State Museum for Craft and Technics&quot) is a museum at Hagen in the southeastern Ruhr region, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It was founded, with each other with the Detmold Open-air Museum, in 1960, and was 1st opened to the public in the early 1970s. The museum is run by the Landschaftsverband Westfalen-Lippe (LWL, regional authority for Westphalia and Lippe inside North Rhine-Westphalia). It lies in the Hagen neighbourhood of Selbecke south of Eilpe in the Mäckingerbach valley.

The open-air museum brings a bit of skilled-trade history into the present, and it takes a hands-on approach. On its grounds stretching for about 42 ha, not only are urban and rural trades basically &quotdisplayed&quot along with their workshops and tools, but in much more than twenty of the almost sixty rebuilt workshops, they are nonetheless practised, and interested guests can, often by themselves, take element in the production.

As early as the 1920s, there had been efforts by a group of engineers and historical preservationists to preserve technological monuments for posterity. The initiator, Wilhelm Claas, even recommended the Mäckingerbach valley as a very good place for a museum to that end. The narrow valley was selected, as wind, water and wood had been the three most important place elements for industry in the 18th and 19th centuries.

In 1960, the Westphalian Open-Air Museum was founded, and thirteen years later, the gates opened to the public. In contrast to most open-air museums, which show everyday life on the farm or in the nation as it was in days gone by, the Hagen Open-Air Museum puts the history of these activities in Westphalia in the fore. From the late 18th century through the early years of the Industrial Revolution to the hugely industrialized society emerging in the early 20th century, the visitor can encounter the development of these trades and the industry in the area.

Crafts and trades demonstrated at the Westphalian Open-Air Museum incorporate ropemaking, smithing, brewing, baking, tanning, printing, milling, papermaking, and much more. A favourite attraction is the triphammer workshop shown in the image above. As soon as the hammer is engaged, a craftsman goes to work noisily forging a scythe, passing it among the hammer and the anvil underneath in a method named peening.

The Hagen Westphalian Open-Air Museum is open from March or April till October.

Hagen – Freilichtmuseum Hagen – Zink Walzwerk Fa. Hoesch 04
milling engineering
Image by Daniel Mennerich
The Hagen Open-air Museum (LWL-Freilichtmuseum Hagen – Westfälisches Landesmuseum für Handwerk und Technik English: &quotLWL Open-air Museum Hagen – Westphalian State Museum for Craft and Technics&quot) is a museum at Hagen in the southeastern Ruhr location, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It was founded, collectively with the Detmold Open-air Museum, in 1960, and was first opened to the public in the early 1970s. The museum is run by the Landschaftsverband Westfalen-Lippe (LWL, regional authority for Westphalia and Lippe inside North Rhine-Westphalia). It lies in the Hagen neighbourhood of Selbecke south of Eilpe in the Mäckingerbach valley.

The open-air museum brings a bit of skilled-trade history into the present, and it requires a hands-on method. On its grounds stretching for about 42 ha, not only are urban and rural trades basically &quotdisplayed&quot along with their workshops and tools, but in far more than twenty of the almost sixty rebuilt workshops, they are nevertheless practised, and interested guests can, sometimes by themselves, take element in the production.

As early as the 1920s, there had been efforts by a group of engineers and historical preservationists to preserve technological monuments for posterity. The initiator, Wilhelm Claas, even suggested the Mäckingerbach valley as a good spot for a museum to that finish. The narrow valley was selected, as wind, water and wood were the 3 most critical location variables for market in the 18th and 19th centuries.

In 1960, the Westphalian Open-Air Museum was founded, and thirteen years later, the gates opened to the public. Unlike most open-air museums, which show each day life on the farm or in the country as it was in days gone by, the Hagen Open-Air Museum puts the history of these activities in Westphalia in the fore. From the late 18th century by way of the early years of the Industrial Revolution to the hugely industrialized society emerging in the early 20th century, the visitor can encounter the improvement of these trades and the business in the region.

Crafts and trades demonstrated at the Westphalian Open-Air Museum incorporate ropemaking, smithing, brewing, baking, tanning, printing, milling, papermaking, and a lot a lot more. A favourite attraction is the triphammer workshop shown in the image above. Once the hammer is engaged, a craftsman goes to perform noisily forging a scythe, passing it in between the hammer and the anvil underneath in a method called peening.

The Hagen Westphalian Open-Air Museum is open from March or April until October.

Hagen – Freilichtmuseum Hagen – Zink Walzwerk Fa. Hoesch 01
milling engineering
Image by Daniel Mennerich
The Hagen Open-air Museum (LWL-Freilichtmuseum Hagen – Westfälisches Landesmuseum für Handwerk und Technik English: &quotLWL Open-air Museum Hagen – Westphalian State Museum for Craft and Technics&quot) is a museum at Hagen in the southeastern Ruhr region, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It was founded, together with the Detmold Open-air Museum, in 1960, and was initial opened to the public in the early 1970s. The museum is run by the Landschaftsverband Westfalen-Lippe (LWL, regional authority for Westphalia and Lippe within North Rhine-Westphalia). It lies in the Hagen neighbourhood of Selbecke south of Eilpe in the Mäckingerbach valley.

The open-air museum brings a bit of skilled-trade history into the present, and it requires a hands-on approach. On its grounds stretching for about 42 ha, not only are urban and rural trades just &quotdisplayed&quot along with their workshops and tools, but in more than twenty of the practically sixty rebuilt workshops, they are nonetheless practised, and interested visitors can, sometimes by themselves, take part in the production.

As early as the 1920s, there had been efforts by a group of engineers and historical preservationists to preserve technological monuments for posterity. The initiator, Wilhelm Claas, even recommended the Mäckingerbach valley as a good place for a museum to that finish. The narrow valley was selected, as wind, water and wood were the three most crucial place aspects for market in the 18th and 19th centuries.

In 1960, the Westphalian Open-Air Museum was founded, and thirteen years later, the gates opened to the public. Unlike most open-air museums, which show everyday life on the farm or in the nation as it was in days gone by, the Hagen Open-Air Museum puts the history of these activities in Westphalia in the fore. From the late 18th century via the early years of the Industrial Revolution to the very industrialized society emerging in the early 20th century, the visitor can knowledge the improvement of these trades and the sector in the area.

Crafts and trades demonstrated at the Westphalian Open-Air Museum include ropemaking, smithing, brewing, baking, tanning, printing, milling, papermaking, and much far more. A favourite attraction is the triphammer workshop shown in the image above. When the hammer is engaged, a craftsman goes to operate noisily forging a scythe, passing it amongst the hammer and the anvil underneath in a approach called peening.

The Hagen Westphalian Open-Air Museum is open from March or April till October.

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