Cool Metal Components China pictures

Verify out these metal components china images:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: South hangar panorama, like Vought OS2U-three Kingfisher seaplane & B-29 Enola Gay, among other folks
metal parts china
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Vought OS2U-3 Kingfisher:

The Kingfisher was the U.S. Navy’s primary ship-based, scout and observation aircraft throughout Globe War II. Revolutionary spot welding methods gave it a smooth, non-buckling fuselage structure. Deflector plate flaps that hung from the wing’s trailing edge and spoiler-augmented ailerons functioned like extra flaps to let slower landing speeds. Most OS2Us operated in the Pacific, where they rescued several downed airmen, including Globe War I ace Eddie Rickenbacker and the crew of his B-17 Flying Fortress.

In March 1942, this airplane was assigned to the battleship USS Indiana. It later underwent a six-month overhaul in California, returned to Pearl Harbor, and rejoined the Indiana in March 1944. Lt. j.g. Rollin M. Batten Jr. was awarded the Navy Cross for generating a daring rescue in this airplane below heavy enemy fire on July four, 1944.

Transferred from the United States Navy.

Manufacturer:
Vought-Sikorsky Aircraft Division

Date:
1937

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
General: 15ft 1 1/8in. x 33ft 9 1/2in., 4122.6lb., 36ft 1 1/16in. (460 x 1030cm, 1870kg, 1100cm)

Materials:
Wings covered with fabric aft of the main spar

Physical Description:
Two-seat monoplane, deflector plate flaps hung from the trailing edge of the wing, ailerons drooped at low airspeeds to function like added flaps, spoilers.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing B-29 Superfortress &quotEnola Gay&quot:

Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress was the most sophisticated propeller-driven bomber of World War II and the 1st bomber to property its crew in pressurized compartments. Despite the fact that created to fight in the European theater, the B-29 located its niche on the other side of the globe. In the Pacific, B-29s delivered a selection of aerial weapons: standard bombs, incendiary bombs, mines, and two nuclear weapons.

On August 6, 1945, this Martin-built B-29-45-MO dropped the first atomic weapon used in combat on Hiroshima, Japan. 3 days later, Bockscar (on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum near Dayton, Ohio) dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. Enola Gay flew as the advance weather reconnaissance aircraft that day. A third B-29, The Fantastic Artiste, flew as an observation aircraft on both missions.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.
Martin Co., Omaha, Nebr.

Date:
1945

Nation of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
General: 900 x 3020cm, 32580kg, 4300cm (29ft 6 5/16in. x 99ft 1in., 71825.9lb., 141ft 15/16in.)

Components:
Polished overall aluminum finish

Physical Description:
4-engine heavy bomber with semi-monoqoque fuselage and higher-aspect ratio wings. Polished aluminum finish all round, standard late-Globe War II Army Air Forces insignia on wings and aft fuselage and serial quantity on vertical fin 509th Composite Group markings painted in black &quotEnola Gay&quot in black, block letters on reduce left nose.

Thames Festival Finale Fireworks
metal parts china
Image by Dominic’s pics
Element of a Set / Virtual Firework Display Slideshow documenting the firework show that marked the finish of the &quotthe mayor’s&quot Thames Festival in London on the evening of Sunday September 11th 2011.

The display was presented by Pains Fireworks.

A delay in the start of the display from the scheduled time was attributed by the crowds to incompetence by &quotBumbling Boris&quot Johnson – the London Mayor – component of the British patrician &quotlimited liability&quot ruling class. &quotI’m in charge, but if something goes wrong, somebody else will be sacked…&quot

Like the extreme audio dynamic variety of Taiko or Samba drumming, it is not truly feasible to record the visual brilliance of fireworks with a camera. You have to experience firework displays live, in individual. These photos had been taken at the slowest sensor speed (ISO one hundred), maximum aperture (to minimise diffraction &quotglare&quot effects) and with a variety of exposure times ranging from about .5 to 2 seconds. The intense light brought on some &quotbleaching&quot of the paths of the lights, and so the colours have been enriched if Photoshop. (In retrospect I might have used a slightly smaller aperture.)In addition, the river and land regions have been selectively lightened in Photoshop. Fortuitously, a gentle breeze caused the smoke to drift eastwards, away from my vantage point on Waterloo Bridge, so the view of the fireworks was fairly unobstructed by smoke.

Fireworks date from at least the 7th century in China. The colours are believed to have been conventional incandescent &quotblack physique&quot bonfire colours: red, orange, yellow and white. (It is theoretically possible to make pale blue just by heating, but this needs impracticably high temperatures. It is not feasible to heat anything to &quotgreen hot&quot or &quotpurple hot&quot.) It is believed that from about 1830 in Italy metal salts were introduced to create a wider, richer hued, spectrum of colours by chemical luminescence. This strategy can be problematic, as it can be tough to produce stable, sensible, chemical compositions. It has been suggested that some shades of green are nevertheless tough to achieve.

See also:

Fireworks [Wikipedia]
Firework Colours [The chemistry of Fireworks by Reema Gondhia, Imperial College]
History of fireworks [Pyro Universe]

Thames Festival Finale Fireworks
metal parts china
Image by Dominic’s pics
Component of a Set / Virtual Firework Show Slideshow documenting the firework show that marked the finish of the &quotthe mayor’s&quot Thames Festival in London on the evening of Sunday September 11th 2011.

The show was presented by Pains Fireworks.

A delay in the start off of the show from the scheduled time was attributed by the crowds to incompetence by &quotBumbling Boris&quot Johnson – the London Mayor – element of the British patrician &quotlimited liability&quot ruling class. &quotI’m in charge, but if something goes incorrect, somebody else will be sacked…&quot

Like the intense audio dynamic variety of Taiko or Samba drumming, it is not actually feasible to record the visual brilliance of fireworks with a camera. You have to knowledge firework displays live, in individual. These photos have been taken at the slowest sensor speed (ISO one hundred), maximum aperture (to minimise diffraction &quotglare&quot effects) and with a assortment of exposure occasions ranging from about .5 to 2 seconds. The intense light caused some &quotbleaching&quot of the paths of the lights, and so the colours have been enriched if Photoshop. (In retrospect I may have used a slightly smaller aperture.)Additionally, the river and land locations have been selectively lightened in Photoshop. Fortuitously, a gentle breeze triggered the smoke to drift eastwards, away from my vantage point on Waterloo Bridge, so the view of the fireworks was fairly unobstructed by smoke.

Fireworks date from at least the 7th century in China. The colours are believed to have been standard incandescent &quotblack physique&quot bonfire colours: red, orange, yellow and white. (It is theoretically possible to generate pale blue just by heating, but this demands impracticably high temperatures. It is not achievable to heat some thing to &quotgreen hot&quot or &quotpurple hot&quot.) It is believed that from about 1830 in Italy metal salts were introduced to make a wider, richer hued, spectrum of colours by chemical luminescence. This strategy can be problematic, as it can be challenging to produce stable, practical, chemical compositions. It has been suggested that some shades of green are nonetheless difficult to achieve.

See also:

Fireworks [Wikipedia]
Firework Colours [The chemistry of Fireworks by Reema Gondhia, Imperial College]
History of fireworks [Pyro Universe]

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